Post-nationalist anthropology? Anthropologies today in their nationalist traditions, cosmopolitan ethos and collaborative possibilities

Post-nationalist anthropology? Anthropologies today in their nationalist traditions, cosmopolitan ethos and collaborative possibilities

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Journal of China in Comparative Perspective > Vol.1 > Issue 2 > Page 91-98

Post-nationalist anthropology? Anthropologies today in their nationalist traditions, cosmopolitan ethos and collaborative possibilities

George E. Marcus

Journal of China in Comparative Perspective (JCCP) is the only peer-reviewed academic dual language journal for social scientific, humanities and comparative studies of China in the world, published biannually in June and December in print and electronic versions from 2015 by the Global China Press. Electronic articles can be accessed online from the JCCP website after you have subscribed to the journal. For institutions, we will need your IP address/es, either on-campus, off-campus or both.

JCCP DOI https://doi.org/10.24103/JCCP Crossref

DOI http://doi.org/10.24103/JCCP.2015.2.8

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Abstract

This article analyzes the situation of still nationally based institutions for anthropological teaching and research, and both assesses and imagines a different vision for anthropologies that are truly post-nationalist, cosmopolitan and collaborative in the production of research projects, both in the training of students and in later endeavours of comparative ethnography. The situation of China especially is assessed as a participant in post-nationalist anthropology.

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Abstract: This article analyzes the situation of still nationally based institutions for anthropological teaching and research, and both assesses and imagines a different vision for anthropologies that are truly post-nationalist, cosmopolitan and collaborative in the production of research projects, both in the training of students and in later endeavours of comparative ethnography. The situation of China especially is assessed as a participant in post-nationalist anthropology.

Keywords: ethnography, post-national, cosmopolitan, collaboration, modernity, comparative method

George Marcus 乔治·马尔库斯 is Chancellor’s Professor and Chair of Department of Anthropology, University of California, Irvine, USA. He is Founding Editor of Cultural Anthropology, Editor of The Late Editions Series of Annuals (1993-2000). His research interests are in the fields of elites, ethnography, cultural critique and Pacific studies. His publications include Writing Culture: The Politics and Poetics of Ethnography (1986, co-edited with James Clifford), Anthropology as Cultural Critique: An Experimental Movement in the Human Sciences (1986, co-authored with Michael M. J. Fischer), Rereading Cultural Anthropology (1992), Ethnography through Thick and Thin (1998), Critical Anthropology Now: Unexpected Contexts, Shifting Constituencies, Changing Agendas (1998, with the contribution of Paul Ra-binow), Designs for an Anthropology of the Contemporary (2008), and Fieldwork Is Not What It Used to Be (2009, co-edited with James Faubion).

Cite this article

George E. Marcus
Post-nationalist anthropology? Anthropologies today in their nationalist traditions, cosmopolitan ethos and collaborative possibilities
Journal of China in Comparative Perspective
Vol.1 Issue 2. 2015, p91-98
DOI: 10.24103/JCCP.2015.2.8
Crossref

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