‘Not a club for ethical culture’ Early writings on the stock exchange by Max Weber, Liang Qichao and Kang Youwei

‘Not a club for ethical culture’ Early writings on the stock exchange by Max Weber, Liang Qichao and Kang Youwei

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Journal of China in Comparative Perspective > Vol.2 > Issue 2 > Page 13-24

‘Not a club for ethical culture’ Early writings on the stock exchange by  Max Weber, Liang Qichao and Kang Youwei

Bryna Goodman

Journal of China in Comparative Perspective (JCCP) is the only peer-reviewed academic dual language journal for social scientific, humanities and comparative studies of China in the world, published biannually in June and December in print and electronic versions from 2015 by the Global China Press. Electronic articles can be accessed online from the JCCP website after you have subscribed to the journal. For institutions, we will need your IP address/es, either on-campus, off-campus or both.

JCCP DOI https://doi.org/10.24103/JCCP Crossref

DOI http://doi.org/10.24103/JCCP.2016.2.2

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Abstract

This paper examines early discussions of stock exchanges by Max Weber, Liang Qichao, and Kang Youwei and considers their contemporaneity. Despite different contexts, the discussions shared a nineteenth-century preoccupation with global competition and Darwinian struggles for survival. All reveal the attendant anxieties of latecomer nations experiencing belated modernity. Weber, however, wrote from a position that embraced German colonialism, whereas Liang and Kang’s advocacy of stock exchanges was marked by concerns for the Chinese nation that emerged as a result of the experience of colonialism and economic imperialism.

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Abstract: This paper examines early discussions of stock exchanges by Max Weber, Liang Qichao, and Kang Youwei and considers their contemporaneity. Despite different contexts, the discussions shared a nineteenth-century preoccupation with global competition and Darwinian struggles for survival. All reveal the attendant anxieties of latecomer nations experiencing belated modernity. Weber, however, wrote from a position that embraced German colonialism, whereas Liang and Kang’s advocacy of stock exchanges was marked by concerns for the Chinese nation that emerged as a result of the experience of colonialism and economic imperialism.

Keywords: Club, ethical culture, stock exchanges, foreign influence

Bryna Goodman  is a Professor of History, Former Director of Asian Studies Program and Oregon Consortium for International and Area Studies, University of Oregon Eugene. She is the author of Native Place, City and Nation: Regional Networks and Identities in Shanghai, 1853-1937 (1995). She is on the editorial board of the journal Twentieth Century China, served as Modern China Editor for Journal of Asian Studies, co-edited Gender in Motion: Divisions of Labor and Cultural Change in Modern China (2005), and Twentieth-Century Colonialism and China: Localities, the Everyday, and the World (2012).

Cite this article

Bryna Goodman

Not a club for ethical culture’ Early writings on the stock exchange by  Max Weber, Liang Qichao and Kang Youwei

Journal of China in Comparative Perspective
Vol.2 Issue 2. 2016, p13-24
DOI: http://doi.org/10.24103/JCCP.2016.2.2
Crossref

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